Yamkela

Album: The Great Depression (2005)

Songfacts®:

  • Yamkela was a street kid that Blindside's lead vocalist Christian Lindskog befriended during a mission trip to South Africa. Lindskog told musicomh.com: "My lyrics have to be personal to me and connected, there has to be a real emotional attachment, and as such I tend to write about what I'm going through at a given time. Yamkela for instance was written about a 10-year old boy I met in South Africa while accompanying my wife on a research trip last year. He was living on the street, his father was not around, his house had burnt down and his mother died of HIV. He had the AIDS virus too, but despite all of that he was full of joy and happiness. Amongst all that suffering and pain he was able to be happy and enjoy life. So that really hit home to me and put things in perspective in a big way." >>
    Suggestion credit:
    Tim - PGH, PA

Comments: 1

  • Trevor from Grand Rapids, MiYamkela is my good friend and is alive and well!
see more comments

Editor's Picks

Michael Franti

Michael FrantiSongwriter Interviews

Franti tells the story behind his hit "Say Hey (I Love You)" and explains why yoga is an integral part of his lifestyle and his Soulshine tour.

Spot The Real Red Hot Chili Peppers Song Titles

Spot The Real Red Hot Chili Peppers Song TitlesMusic Quiz

The Red Hot Chili Peppers have some rather unusual song titles - see if you can spot the real ones.

Mike Scott of The Waterboys

Mike Scott of The WaterboysSongwriter Interviews

The stories behind "Whole Of The Moon" and "Red Army Blues," and why rock music has "outlived its era of innovation."

Adam Schlesinger of Fountains of Wayne

Adam Schlesinger of Fountains of WayneSongwriter Interviews

The guy who brought us "Stacy's Mom" also wrote the Jane Lynch Emmy song and Stephen Colbert's Christmas songs.

90s Metal

90s MetalFact or Fiction

Test your metal - Priest, Maiden, and Beavis and Butt-head show up in this one.

Leslie West of Mountain

Leslie West of MountainSongwriter Interviews

From the cowbell on "Mississippi Queen" to recording with The Who when they got the wrong Felix, stories from one of rock's master craftsmen.