Meeting Across the River

Album: Born to Run (1975)
  • This is one of Springsteen's character songs where he examines the psyche of someone down on his luck. The main character is a common criminal who has worked himself into a bit of trouble.
  • This song was the inspiration for the 2005 book titled Meeting Across the River: Stories Inspired by the Haunting Bruce Springsteen Song, which is a collection of 21 short stories. >>
    Suggestion credit:
    Laura - New York, NY
  • The haunting Jazz-inspired flugelhorn was played by Randy Brecker, formerly of Blood Sweat and Tears. Jazz veteran Richard Davis contributed the upright bass. He also played on Van Morrison's Astral Weeks album.

Comments: 2

  • Daniel from Seattle, WaTom Waits said that he wished HE had written this song. Springsteen repaid the complement by doing Waits' "Jersey Girl."
  • Derek from Shrewsbury, Magreat song not very well known but thats understandable because its so slow
see more comments

Jack Blades of Night Ranger and Damn YankeesSongwriter Interviews

Revisit the awesome glory of Night Ranger and Damn Yankees: cheesily-acted videos, catchy guitar licks, long hair, and lyrics that are just plain relatable.

The Truth Is Out There: A History of Alien SongsSong Writing

The trail runs from flying saucer songs in the '50s, through Bowie, blink-182 and Katy Perry.

Pete AndersonSongwriter Interviews

Pete produced Dwight Yoakam, Michelle Shocked, Meat Puppets, and a very memorable track for Roy Orbison.

Charlie DanielsSongwriter Interviews

Charlie discusses the songs that made him a Southern Rock icon, and settles the Devil vs. Johnny argument once and for all.

Charlie Benante of AnthraxSongwriter Interviews

The drummer for Anthrax is also a key songwriter. He explains how the group puts their songs together and tells the stories behind some of their classics.

Susanna Hoffs - "Eternal Flame"They're Playing My Song

The Prince-penned "Manic Monday" was the first song The Bangles heard coming from a car radio, but "Eternal Flame" is closest to Susanna's heart, perhaps because she sang it in "various states of undress."