No Particular Place To Go

Album: St. Louis to Liverpool (1964)
Charted: 3 10
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  • Lyrics
  • "No Particular Place To Go" was written at a time when Chuck Berry had literally no place to go. He was in prison. Chuck first saw the inside of a slammer back in the 1940s due to a youthful folly, but it is fair to say that since then his encounters with the law have been more low key and if anything somewhat contrived.

    Although this song didn't enrage Mrs. Whitehouse like his later, number one hit, in which he offered to show us his ding-a-ling, it is fairly laden with innuendo, although of the tragic kind, because herein, our hero is unable to unfasten his safety belt.
  • "No Particular Place To Go" was released in May 1964 backed by the instrumental "Liverpool Drive", and is instantly recognizable as a Berry composition with his distinctive, clean cut guitar style. >>
    Suggestion credit:
    Alexander Baron - London, England, for above 2
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