Freedom

Album: Til The Casket Drops (2009)

Songfacts®:

  • This is the opening track from Virginia hip hop duo Clipse's third studio album, Till The Casket Drops. Clipse comprises of brothers Malice (Gene Thornton) and Pusha T (Terrence Thornton).
  • Pusha told MTV News that this is a "redemption song." He added: "It's an apology, it gives a rhyme and reason for some of the things and some of the attitudes of the Clipse. It says 'sorry' just as much as it says we're better [than other rappers], and we're still the best... ever."
    MTV asked Pusha what they're apologizing for in this song. He replied: "Nothing musically. This is our lives. This music has affected a lot of people and lot of lives around us. Once we get from in front of the camera, there's a whole world out there that we're a part of: family, friends, streets. It's a lot that goes on and a lot that goes on behind this."

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