Lonely Press Play

Album: Everyday Robots (2014)
  • This dirge-like ballad finds Albarn crooning lyrics of isolation and loneliness. It is one of several satirical rants on Everday Robots against 21st century tech obsession.
  • Albarn explained the song to The Sun: "That starts really strangely with arrhythmia, which means when your heart beat is irregular," he said. "It's about accepting that you live with uncertainty."

    "The 'press play' refers to abstractions in an everyday sense, whether it's watching a DVD or putting on the radio or passing time playing a game on the tube," he added.

    "We live in a world where the symbols like the (press play) triangle has become synonymous with time out," Albarn continued. "It goes back to the Egyptians and their esoteric take on the whole universe."
  • The video is made up of scenes from Albarn's travels filmed on the Blur frontman's iPad. The clip visits Tokyo, Dallas, Utah, North Korea, Iceland, as well as London, Devon and Colchester in the UK.

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