Dead Flowers

Album: True Defiance (2012)
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Songfacts®:

  • DH frontman and songwriter Ryan Clark uses words that appear to convey one thing but means something deeper on several True Defiance tracks, including this one. He told Alternative Press: "In this case, there are quite a few double-meanings within the chorus, which I think packs the song full of life. Dead flowers both symbolize and commemorate a deceased loved one. The water that once kept them alive is now being begged for as a flood of cleansing - like tears from the Heavens. And the sun that nurtured the life of the flowers is also used in reference to the Son of God, offering eternal life."
  • Regular Solid State and Tooth & Nail Producer Aaron Sprinkle was the man twiddling the knobs on the album and it was he who came up with the addition of the harpsichord to this song's intro and verses. Clark told Alternative Press: "I originally had that melody mapped out with guitar, and it's still in there, but lower in the mix to allow the harpsichord to shine."
  • This was the last song that Clark wrote for the album, about a week before the band entered the studio. Clark told AntiMusic: "It's not uncommon for me to write the slower songs towards the end of the writing process. Usually I'll be knee-deep in 'heavy mode' while I write all of the more aggressive songs, and I have to make a conscious switch into "ballad" territory."
  • Clark discussed the song's lyrical content with AntiMusic: "Mortality is a subject that really resonates with people. That's probably why I'm so drawn to it when writing lyrics. For those familiar with our previous work, you can see death playing a fairly large role in most of our slower songs."
  • This is the first Demon Hunter song that features a key change in the chorus. Said Clark to AntiMusic: "I love key changes, and it's something I've often meant to do in the past, and before I know it, the song is done and I forgot to make it a priority. With this song, I was determined to incorporate a key change. The step up happens directly in the middle of the guitar solo, so the final chorus (through the end of the song) is one key higher than the rest. The second half of the final chorus also features a 3-part harmony, something I believe we've only done once before."

Comments: 1

  • Mike from Norwalk, CtLove this song. To me it talks about how we are dead to the world but alive in Christ. And if you're broken hearted dead flowers means the opposite. Means you are giving life, not death.
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