As Long As The Price Is Right

Album: Be Seeing You (1977)
Charted: 40

Songfacts®:

  • According to Tony Moon in Down by the Jetty: The Dr. Feelgood Story, "As Long As The Price Is Right" was written by Larry Wallis under pressure. At that time, Wallis was with Pink Fairies and was hanging out at Stiff Records. Nick Lowe asked him to come up with something because the band didn't have enough material, and "Wallis rashly agreed over the phone to come down to the studio the following morning with a suitable song". He wrote it from scratch as "a perfect slice of Feelgood imagery". The last line had to be altered, but it became one of the best songs on the album.

    For a song written under pressure if not to order, it didn't turn out at all bad.
  • Running to 3 minutes 15 seconds, this was released on the United Artists Records label backed by "Down At The (Other) Doctors", which is basically an alternative arrangement of "Down At The Doctors". >>
    Suggestion credit:
    Alexander Baron - London, England, for above 2

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