Milord

Album: The Very Best of Edith Piaf (1959)

Songfacts®:

  • Pronounced "me-lor", along with "Non, Je Ne Regrette Rien" this is arguably Édith Piaf most recognizable song, and like "Non," was also recorded by her in English, after a fashion.

    Released in 1959, it has lyrics by Georges Moustaki and music in 2/4 time by regular Piaf collaborator Marguerite Monnot. Known alternatively as "Ombre De La Rue" - literally "shadow on the street" - this is a song that harks back to Piaf's own youth as it is addressed by a young woman, very likely a prostitute, to an English gentleman.

    Although Piaf never sold her body, she did have the misfortune of growing up in a brothel.

    A massive hit including in Germany, it was recorded several times in English, by Cher, among others, and in both Italian and Swedish. >>
    Suggestion credit:
    Alexander Baron - London, England

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