All Of Me

Album: All of Me (2012)

Songfacts®:

  • This is the opening and title track of English R&B singer-songwriter Estelle's third album. The song is a tribute to Dinah Washington's version of the jazz standard of the same name. The record was released in the United States on February 28, 2012 and in the United Kingdom two weeks later.
  • The song is intended to immediately get the listener's attention. "They said that all I had to do was rap again/ Go ahead and get back to black again,'' Estelle spits reclaiming a sense of purpose. She explained to The Boston Globe: "This album was me saying, this is me. With every single album you go through a growth spurt, and every couple of years you become a different person. It just so happened that these past few years have been an accelerated, very visceral version of events for me. People are going to understand who the hell I am this time around. Not that I didn't do that before, but this time I'm going to let you know before you come out with anything crazy about me. I had to go back and find my love of rap and figure out why I got in the game in the first place. I had to go back and find the joy and love. It got really boring."

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