Downtown Love

Album: These Things Happen (2014)

Songfacts®:

  • G-Eazy explained during a Reddit AMA that this song is, "kinda loosely based off of Edie Sedgwick and her story, but told in a modern setting."

    Edie Sedgwick (1943 – 1971) was a socialite who formed part of the artist Andy Warhol's Factory scene in New York in the '60s and starred in several of his short films. Plagued by mental health issues and drug addictions, she died in 1971 aged 28 of an overdose.

    Sedgwick had a brief affair with Bob Dylan and "Just Like A Woman" and "Leopard-Skin Pill-Box Hat" from his 1966 album Blonde on Blonde were both purportedly penned about her. The Velvet Underground's "Femme Fatale" from their 1967 album The Velvet Underground & Nico and The Cult's 1969 hit single "Edie (Ciao Baby)" were also inspired by the troubled socialite.
  • The song is preceded on These Things Happen by "Factory Girl (Skit)" which is sampled from the Merv Griffin show in the 60s when Edie Sedgwick and Andy Warhol were guests.

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