Are You Receiving Me

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  • Running to 9 minutes 33 seconds, "Are You Receiving Me" - sans questionmark - is the final, longest, and arguably finest track on the 1973 Moontan album. The other four tracks, including the monster hit "Radar Love", were co-written by lead guitarist George Kooymans and Barry Hay; this one alone has a third songwriter credit, John Fenton.
  • Largely instrumental, this distinctly metaphysical track might well go down as the band's masterpiece. A few rock/contemporary songs are noted for fine saxophone solos, "Baker Street" and "Will You?" spring to mind; although subdued, "Are You Receiving Me" also has some equally great sax intertwined with some great overdubbed Kooymans guitar. >>
    Suggestion credit:
    Alexander Baron - London, England, for above 2
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Comments: 1

  • Bongo Fury from EarthSecond concert every attended @ 14 years old 1974 /Winterland, S.F. (First was Frank Zappa earlier that year). Opened for Joe Cocker who didn't finish show (puked behind piano). Didn't matter, Earring blew the stage up that night regardless. Great show.
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