Ocean

Album: Silver Eye (2017)

Songfacts®:

  • Goldfrapp conclude their Silver Eye album with this dark, industrial-sounding tune. It was created by Alison Goldfrapp and Will Gregory during a morning session and built from what the singer calls "a very small improvisation." Alison Goldfrapp recalled to Billboard magazine:

    "I remember coming into the studio one morning and I think we just had a few drums going and it was really basic. Will said, 'Do you fancy doing some vocals this morning?' I was really pissed off, in a really bad mood. I was having a bit of a weird time. So I was like, 'Alright then' and slightly reluctantly I went into the vocal booth and the words just came out. We tried to re-record the vocals four or five times but never quite had the same sort of atmosphere as that original vocal, so in the end we decided to keep it."
  • Goldfrapp re-recorded the track for the Silver Eye: Deluxe Edition. The new version is a duet with Dave Gahan from Depeche Mode.

Comments: 1

  • Daniel from BerlinTo me it’s another song about death (“people collector”). Maybe even suicide for love. A theme already touched on “A&E”.
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