Astrobiology Rap

Album: Astrobiology Magazine (2008)
  • Rap music is better known for four letter words than for six syllabled ones, so "Astrobiology Rap" is a pleasant surprise. The boys at NASA were so impressed with this composition of Londoner Jonathan Chase that they published it in the European edition of Astrobiology Magazine. Chase raps in flawless English, and his didactic poem put to music is supplemented by soundbytes from Professor Stephen Hawking and President John F. Kennedy, who would doubtless have approved of this original effort. Chase though is not the first London rapper to put this at times blighted artform to productive use. Previously, South London firefighter Stephen-remell Coleman had used it to raise awareness of smoke alarms. >>
    Suggestion credit:
    Alexander Baron - London, England

Comments: 1

  • Matt from Houston, TxI don't understand. why would it matter how many letters or syllables are in the title.it's the song that matters. it's the pages. the title is the cover. music is like a library. the artists are the authors. the title is the cover. songs are pages
see more comments

Zac HansonSongwriter Interviews

Zac tells the story of Hanson's massive hit "MMMbop," and talks about how brotherly bonds effect their music.

Curt Kirkwood of Meat PuppetsSongwriter Interviews

The (Meat)puppetmaster takes us through songs like "Lake Of Fire" and "Backwater," and talks about performing with Kurt Cobain on MTV Unplugged.

Album Cover InspirationsSong Writing

Some album art was at least "inspired" by others. A look at some very similar covers.

Paul WilliamsSongwriter Interviews

He's a singer and an actor, but as a songwriter Paul helped make Kermit a cultured frog, turned a bank commercial into a huge hit and made love both "exciting and new" and "soft as an easy chair."

Artis the SpoonmanSong Writing

Even before Soundgarden wrote a song about him, Artis was the most famous spoon player of all time. So why has he always been broke?

Keith Reid of Procol HarumSongwriter Interviews

As Procol Harum's lyricist, Keith wrote the words to "A Whiter Shade Of Pale." We delve into that song and find out how you can form a band when you don't sing or play an instrument.