Children

Album: Purpose (2015)
Charted: 44 74

Songfacts®:

  • This song was originally produced by:

    Jason "Poo Bear" Boyd, Bieber's go-to co-writer since the two met in Las Vegas at a 2013 party.

    Jive recording artist and producer Maejor, whose previous collaborations with Bieber include the Believe track, "One Love."

    Nico Stadi, who also supplied instrumentation and programming on 5 Seconds of Summer's Sounds Good Feels Good album.
  • Californian DJ Skrillex later reworked the production. He recalled to NME: "The original version of 'Children' was written like a typical EDM song at the writing session we did. It almost sounded like something that Swedish House Mafia could've produced a couple of years ago. I don't mean that in a negative way."

    "It was major sounding too, so I reproduced it to be minor sounding and emotional. It's a very simple message Justin is conveying through that song. I can't speak for him, but I think he's starting to grapple with the fact he's a role model for a generation."

Comments

Be the first to comment...

Editor's Picks

Gilby Clarke

Gilby ClarkeSongwriter Interviews

The Guns N' Roses rhythm guitarist in the early '90s, Gilby talks about the band's implosion and the side projects it spawned.

Grunge Bands Quiz

Grunge Bands QuizMusic Quiz

If the name Citizen Dick means anything to you, there's a chance you'll get some of these right.

Kevin Godley

Kevin GodleySongwriter Interviews

Kevin Godley talks about directing classic videos for The Police, U2 and Duran Duran, and discusses song and videos he made with 10cc and Godley & Creme.

History Of Rock

History Of RockSong Writing

An interview with Dr. John Covach, music professor at the University of Rochester whose free online courses have become wildly popular.

Adam Duritz of Counting Crows

Adam Duritz of Counting CrowsSongwriter Interviews

"Mr. Jones" took on new meaning when the song about a misguided view of fame made Adam famous.

80s Video Director Jay Dubin

80s Video Director Jay DubinSong Writing

Billy Joel and Hall & Oates hated making videos, so they chose a director with similar contempt for the medium. That was Jay Dubin, and he has a lot to say on the subject.