Amoureuse

Album: Loving & Free (1973)
Charted: 13
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Songfacts®:

  • The title of this song means literally "in love"; it was composed by French singer-songwriter Véronique Sanson. Originally the title track of her acclaimed 1972 album, a faithful English lyric was produced by Elton John collaborator Gary Osbourne, and the single, backed by "Rest My Head" was released on the Rocket Label by Kiki Dee in 1973. >>
    Suggestion credit:
    Alexander Baron - London, England

Comments: 4

  • Mark Jackman from Marlow BucksWho arranged the orchestra on this track? I assume it was probably not Paul Buckmaster, although there are similarities.
  • Shaun from Warrington, United KingdomHauntingly beautiful.
  • Michael from Bradford, EnglandThe English lyric concerns a woman's first experience - but not the French. The French lyric is about a woman deeply in love (a forbidden love) but who fears that it will not last (Et je me demande si cet amour aura un lendemain
    = I wonder if this love will have a tomorrow).
  • Zabadak from London, EnglandA beautiful song about a woman's first sexual experience.
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