Sun Of Jean

Album: Yesterday's Gone (2017)
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Songfacts®:

  • The closing track of Yesterday's Gone features Loyle Carner's mother reading a poem over piano played by his late stepfather. The album itself is named after a track on a secret record that the MC's stepdad recorded before his death in 2014.

    "He recorded it in the basement; he was a brilliant musician but it never happened for him," explained Carner to NME.

    After his mum found the secret album, Carner put it on his laptop and discovered "Yesterday's Gone." "It was almost like he was talking to me now, after everything that happened," said Carner. "Him going, 'Pick yourself up and get on with it.'"

    The original song now appears as a hidden track on Carner's album.

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