Beast Mode

Album: Ludaversal (2015)
  • Ludacris takes a dig here at those naysayers who reckoned the rapper's successful Hollywood film career have made him musically complacent. "Of course, I'm definitely one of those artists that's blessed to have been able to kinda transition into movies and acting and all that," he stated during a Ludaversal listening party. "But when you're hearing these records, it is a point to prove I never forgot where I came from, one. And two, that stereotype that just because somebody's acting that they don't give a damn about the music anymore."

    "Beast Mode is just straight three minutes of rapping, it ain't no hook, ain't nothing, it's just metaphors," he added.
  • Ludacris' rhymes were inspired by Seattle Seahawks running back Marshawn Lynch. "I just did the video with Marshawn Lynch because it was inspired by him, the same way he runs people down on the damn field," said the Atlanta spitter. "I feel like I'm running through motherf---ers in the industry and I'll still slaughter your favorite rapper."
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