I Want You

Songfacts®:

  • This song from the debut Marian Hill album Act One finds their vocalist, Samantha Gongol, playing the seductress:

    I'd like to dress you up and
    Take you on a carpet ride


    When they started writing songs together, Gongol and Jeremy Lloyd (the producer in the Marian Hill duo) wrote lyrics to suit the music, which had a sultry, sophisticated feel. As they did, a character developed that Gongol describes as "a confident, empowered, take-charge woman." This character also appears on "Down," the breakout hit from the album.
  • Gongol invokes the "hate to see you leave but love to watch you walk away" trope when she sings:

    We could be so cliché
    I hate to see you leave but
    Love to watch you walk away


    In a Songfacts interview with Marian Hill, Jeremy Lloyd explained: "It comes from the feeling of the song, which is, "F--k all of the pretense and try to be cool about it." So it's saying, "Look, I could try to be wittier about it, but I'm so into you that I'm just down to be cliché and here's one."
  • The video was directed by Ian Eastwood, who also did the choreography. It was shot at YouTube Space NY, a production studio the company opened in 2014. In the video, a troupe of dancers interpret the song though movement before the Marian Hill duo join in with their own dance moves.

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