Don't Forget Who You Are

Album: Don't Forget Who You Are (2013)
  • This rockibilly stomp finds Kane urging the listener not to "let your worries dictate who you are." The singer told Digital Spy why he chose to name his second solo album after this song. "I have phases sometimes when I worry about stuff, as everyone does," he explained. "Whether it's over a girl or a friend or a tune, those things can take over your mind. [The title] is that thing of remembering that, and I wrote that lyric down one afternoon - it's such an important lyric that I wanted to focus on it. I've seen people that you've had feelings for that can get caught up in this world of fame and chasing something, and it ain't the way to be. It's just never forgetting who you are and what you want from life. It goes for anyone, whatever job it is."
  • The shop on the album cover is called AJ Skelley and belongs to Miles Kane's mother, who is a butcher in Liverpool market. You can see her as well as two of his aunties on the artwork working in the shop.

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