Happy Now?

Album: Tragic Kingdom (1995)

Songfacts®:

  • "Don't Speak" is the most famous song No Doubt frontwoman Gwen Stefani wrote about her breakup with the group's bass player Tony Kanal, but "Happy Now" is the most scathing. "It's the perfect revenge song of someone who got hurt in love," she explained in a video. "It really was meant to be painful."
  • Their love affair was no longer, but Stefani and Kanal maintained a surprisingly functional working relationship at this time. In fact, Kanal wrote the music for "Happy Now?" with No Doubt guitarist Tom Dumont. How did he pull it off? Kanal says he didn't really process it at the time; it really sunk in later when he heard the song on the radio and the DJ said, "Take that, Tony."
  • This was a popular live song when the band toured for Tragic Kingdom. It was their third album, but first to make an impact, and that impact was huge: It went on to sell over 10 million copies in America.

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