Enemy Gene

Album: False Priest (2010)
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  • This track features Atlanta-based singer-songwriter Janelle Monáe, who also appears on "Our Riotous Defects." Frontman Kevin Barnes told Spin magazine: "Meeting Janelle and her Wondaland Arts Society crew is one of the greatest things to happen in the past year. There's a weird disconnect between Athens and Atlanta. I didn't really know any Atlanta musicians, but in the last few years I met Bradford Cox from Deerhunter and the Wondaland Arts Society, and it's a beautiful artistic romance. They'll send me mixes of songs, and vice versa. They've been a huge influence and inspiration on me. We'll definitely work together a lot more in the future. There are a lot of ideas in the works and those will probably be something we focus on a lot over the next year."
  • Barnes explained this song to Spin: "It has sci-fi elements. I've been reading a lot of Philip K. Dick and thinking about the future -- people have a dark vision of it. The track is about technology robbing us of our organic connection to nature. It has a complex, semi-abstract story."
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