Only Our Hearts

Album: Kisses On The Bottom (2012)

Songfacts®:

  • This a track from Paul McCartney's 2012 album Kisses On The Bottom. The record is a collection of romantic ballads, mainly covers of classic songs from pre-Elvis days that his family used to sing. Said Paul, "This is very tender, very intimate. This is an album you listen to at home after work, with a glass of wine or a cup of tea."

    Macca's former Beatle bandmate Ringo Starr's first solo album, 1970's Sentimental Journey, was also a similar collection of classic tunes from the 1920s, '30s and '40s.
  • This romantic number is one of two original tracks from the record, the other one being "My Valentine." McCartney wrote both new songs, in the same vintage style as the tunes he covered.
  • The song features a harmonica solo by Stevie Wonder. The Motown legend previously collaborated with McCartney on their 1982 hit single "Ebony and Ivory."
  • This was arranged by veteran American composer Johnny Mandel, who is best known for his theme song for the movie and TV series MASH.

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