Remorse Code

Album: Truelove's Gutter (2009)

Songfacts®:

  • Hawley told The Sun September 18, 2009 the story behind this song: "It's about a pal of mine who's in a bit of a mess, pretty much where I was ten years or so ago except I got out of the car before it crashed into the wall. He's crashed his car, gone through the wall, fell of the cliff, trashed it totally but still it drives on. He lost his family, house, job, the lot cocaine and STILL does it. I am not judging as I live in a glasshouse, so to speak, but I stopped because I didn't want to lose my loved ones and the love and respect of my mates. Also I wasn't too keen on dying just yet. It's too high a price to pay but he doesn't seem to get it. It's a love song for a lost friend and a lost future. I hope the shock of it makes him wake up. I had no other options left with which to help him. It's a mirror held up right in his big beautiful daft face. I love the man, always will."

Comments

Be the first to comment...

Editor's Picks

Cheerleaders In Music Videos

Cheerleaders In Music VideosSong Writing

It started with a bouncy MTV classic. Nirvana and MCR made them scary, then Gwen, Avril and Madonna put on the pom poms.

Bryan Adams

Bryan AdamsSongwriter Interviews

What's the deal with "Summer of '69"? Bryan explains what the song is really about, and shares more of his songwriting insights.

Chrissie Hynde of The Pretenders

Chrissie Hynde of The PretendersSongwriter Interviews

The rock revolutionist on songwriting, quitting smoking, and what she thinks of Rush Limbaugh using her song.

Intentionally Atrocious

Intentionally AtrociousSong Writing

A selection of songs made to be terrible - some clearly achieved that goal.

He Hit Me (And It Felt Like A Kiss): A History Of Abuse Pop

He Hit Me (And It Felt Like A Kiss): A History Of Abuse PopSong Writing

Songs that seem to glorify violence against women are often misinterpreted - but not always.

Dexys (Kevin Rowland and Jim Paterson)

Dexys (Kevin Rowland and Jim Paterson)Songwriter Interviews

"Come On Eileen" was a colossal '80s hit, but the band - far more appreciated in their native UK than stateside - released just three albums before their split. Now, Dexys is back.