Another Park, Another Sunday

Album: What Were Once Vices Are Now Habits (1974)
Charted: 32
  • songfacts ®
  • Artistfacts ®
  • Lyrics
  • This song has an interesting history: Released as a single, it's B-side, "Black Water," became a #1 hit after DJs flipped the record and started playing that one instead. There is another reason by radio rejected "Another Park, Another Sunday," however. Doobie Brothers lead singer Tom Johnston, who wrote the song, explains, "It was doing real well, and then it got yanked off the radio for the line, 'And the radio just seems to bring me down,' because the song being played reminded me of the girl. But radio took it as, 'Oh, yeah? The radio brings you down, huh? Well, guess what?' – yank. They pulled it off the air. Which I thought was a little over the top, because at that time, 'Sweet Virginia' by the Rolling Stones was out, and they were singing about sweeping the s--t off the shoes, and that was okay."
  • According to Johnston, this song was inspired by real events. He told us: "That was based on breaking up with a girlfriend. And that's basically what that was all about. Including the park and all the rest of it." (Check out the full interview with Tom Johnston.)
Please sign in or register to post comments.

Comments: 5

  • Doobie from FloridaInteresting that nobody has noted that the melody of this song can be heard in a demo song titled "I'll Keep On Givin'" heard on a 1970 unauthorized album titled "On Our Way Up."
  • Joe from Ne UsAlso, great chordal changes.. and.. as the previous commenters have suggest, it does have a melancholy mood.
  • Joe from Ne UsVery special song for me! I still remember I rode my bicycle up to local record store (Waxie Maxies) to buy the 45 for $1 back in Spring of 74. I'll always have a special place for this song, and I grew to like Black Water on the flip side, but this prob my fav by DB.
  • Camille from Toronto, OhMarch, 2010-A beautiful, haunting melody accompanied by lyrics that speak of the love-lost experience and its aftermath of bleakness that many of us have felt as some point in our lives. Love it.
  • Thomas from Oklahoma City, OkThis song takes me back to a very painful college days breakup. After all these years it still reaches into my heart and rips it in two.
see more comments

Andy McClusky of OMDSongwriter Interviews

Known in America for the hit "If You Leave," OMD is a huge influence on modern electronic music.

Ian Anderson: "The delight in making music is that you don't have a formula"Songwriter Interviews

Ian talks about his 3 or 4 blatant attempts to write a pop song, and also the ones he most connected with, including "Locomotive Breath."

N.W.A vs. the WorldSong Writing

How the American gangsta rappers made history by getting banned in the UK.

Dino Cazares of Fear FactorySongwriter Interviews

The guitarist/songwriter explains how he came up with his signature sound, and deconstructs some classic Fear Factory songs.

Penny Ford of Snap!Songwriter Interviews

The original voice of Snap!, this story is filled with angry drag queens, video impersonators and Chaka Khan.

Rebecca St. JamesSongwriter Interviews

This Australian Christian music star found herself a California surfer guy, giving new meaning to her song "Wait For Me."