Always There...In Our Hearts

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  • Vocalist Wayne Coyne told Mojo magazine: "'Always There...In Our Hearts' reminds me of the Dark Side of the Moon. We're giving you some noble s--t, saying there is love and pain and evil, which sounds like pretentious bulls--t, but in the right context, we're saying that it's true for us right now. When art does that, it's awesome."
  • Wayne Coyne expanded on the song's meaning to MusicRadar.com: "We knew we were going to do it as the last song on the record," he said. "I think we looked at it like the song that ends Pink Floyd's Dark Side of the Moon. It's this summary: If we believe 'this,' then we must believe 'this.' If we think 'this' is true, then we must accept 'this' as true.

    "It sort of repeats, like a mantra," he added. "It's like you're getting ready to jump off a bridge, and you're telling yourself, 'This is what I want. I'm scared, but I want this. I have to do it.'

    "And then it breaks to the end, when it says, 'The joy of life can overwhelm.' That's The Terror. We're deciding we're going to live our lives up on this higher level where we get more sunshine. It's almost as if the more joy we seek, the more pain we'll feel, too. But we can't live any other way, and we're accepting that. We'll have joy, but we'll also have pain."
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