Listen To Me

Album: Hollies Sing Hollies (1968)
Charted: 11 129

Songfacts®:

  • In this persuasive pop song, lead singer Allan Clarke is trying to convince his friend that he needs to appreciate the girl who cares about him - a tough task since he's too blind to see it.
  • The Hollies wrote most of their own songs around this time, but "Listen To Me" came from an outside writer: Tony Hazzard, whose other hits of the era include "Me, The Peaceful Heart" by Lulu and "Fox On The Run" by Manfred Mann. The song was recorded at Abbey Road Studios with producer Ron Richards.
  • In a Songfacts interview with Tony Hazzard, he said that this song started with the line, "Your ears are deaf, your mouth is dumb, your eyes are blind," and the song materialized from there. "Sometimes it's not so much inspiration as imagination," said Hazzard.
  • This was the last Hollies single with founding member Graham Nash, who left to form Crosby, Stills & Nash with David Crosby and Stephen Stills.

Comments

Be the first to comment...

Editor's Picks

Psychedelic Lyrics

Psychedelic LyricsMusic Quiz

Whoa man! Do you know which band came up with these cosmic lyrics?

Verdine White of Earth, Wind & Fire

Verdine White of Earth, Wind & FireSongwriter Interviews

The longtime bassist of Earth, Wind & Fire discusses how his band came to do a holiday album, and offers insight into some of the greatest dance/soul tunes of all-time.

Steely Dan

Steely DanFact or Fiction

Did they really trade their guitarist to The Doobie Brothers? Are they named after something naughty? And what's up with the band name?

Soul Train Stories with Stephen McMillian

Soul Train Stories with Stephen McMillianSong Writing

A Soul Train dancer takes us through a day on the show, and explains what you had to do to get camera time.

Queen

QueenFact or Fiction

Scaramouch, a hoople and a superhero soundtrack - see if you can spot the real Queen stories.

Jon Anderson of Yes

Jon Anderson of YesSongwriter Interviews

From the lake in "Roundabout" to Sister Bluebird in "Starship Trooper," Jon Anderson talks about how nature and spirituality play into his lyrics for Yes.