Album: Floodland (1987)
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Songfacts®:

  • Frontman Andrew Eldritch used the year of his birth, 1959, to represent a bygone time of innocence - but not in the sense of childlike purity. The goth rocker insists he was never that innocent. While discussing the track with Sounds magazine in 1987, he explained: "I really dispute the idea of childlike innocence. I don't recall anything but being potentially deceitful; I was always very aware of deceit. I remember at three reading books about treachery, I had the most treacherous version of Robin Hood that I've ever read! My Godfather gave me Lord Of The Rings, it was so much more interesting than Peter Rabbit."
  • The track is uncharacteristically stark with Eldritch's deep vocals accompanied only by a piano... kind of. He told Bravo magazine: "This one was programmed on the computer note by note without even touching a piano key."

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