Yesterday

Album: Pulse (2009)
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Songfacts®:

  • This is the lead single on R&B singer songwriter Toni Braxton's sixth studio album Pulse, her debut recording with the Atlantic record label. It was her first release after a four year hiatus.
  • The song features Braxton's Atlantic labelmate Trey Songz, who lends his distinctive vocal stylings to the track.
  • The song's music video was directed by filmmaker Bille Woodruff, known for such classic Braxton clips as "Un-Break My Heart" and "He Wasn't Man Enough."
  • Braxton told Digital Spy the story behind the song: "Well, I heard the song and it was written from a guy's perspective, so I said, 'Nice song - let me rework it'. I changed it up and made it a girl's song. I'm going through a separation, and it's not my story per se, but I definitely can relate to it in the sense of starting over. I wanted to have strength when I sang it - I didn't want to be a wimp!"

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