Soldier, Soldier, Will You Marry Me?

Album: various (1903)
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Songfacts®:

  • This traditional song is probably the reason all the nice girls love a sailor. It is a dialogue between a soldier and a girl who would dearly love to be a soldier's wife, his in particular. Alas...

    Written in 4/4 time, the title varies. There are variations on the title: "Soldier, Soldier, Will You Marry Me?"; "O Soldier Won't You Marry Me?" etc.

    It appears to be of fairly recent origin, and was first collected as late as 1903. It is fairly well known on both sides of the Atlantic, but is probably of English origin. >>
    Suggestion credit:
    Alexander Baron - London, England

Comments: 2

  • AnonymousWho is the original composer of this song?
  • Ian from BristolI'm not familiar with this tune, and the lyrics which I know were popularised by the BBC in the 1950s
    The earliest reference is to 1903.
    It sounds a bit Walter de la Mare-ish. Does anyone know who wrote the BBC version, please?
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