D.O.A.

Album: Bloodrock 2 (1970)
Charted: 36
  • Laying here looking at the ceiling
    Someone lays a sheet across my chest
    Something warm is flowing down my fingers
    Pain is flowing all through my back

    I try to move my arms and there's no feeling
    And when I look I see there's nothing there
    The face beside me stopped it totally bleeding
    The girl I knew has such a distant stare

    I remember
    We were flying along and hit something in the air
    I remember
    We were flying along and hit something in the air

    Then I looked straight at the attendant
    His face is pale as it can be
    He bends and whispers something softly
    He says there's no chance for me

    I remember
    We were flying along and hit something in the air
    I remember
    We were flying along and hit something in the air

    Life is flowing out my body
    Pain is flowing out with my blood
    The sheets are red and moist where I'm lying
    God in Heaven, teach me how to die

    I remember
    We were flying along and hit something in the air
    I remember
    We were flying along and hit something in the air Writer/s: BENJAMIN LLOYD JOLLIFFE, FRASER MACLEOD TAYLOR, GUSTAV TOMAS WOOD, JOHN STUART TAYLOR, SIMON MITCHELL
    Publisher: BMG Rights Management
    Lyrics licensed and provided by LyricFind

Comments: 12

  • Cee Gee Dee from Big D, Texas, UsaI knew as a kid it was dark, gloomy, HEAVY. Wasn't sure if it came out in 69, 70, 71. Apparently the latter. And, yes, the Hit something in the air lyric is very ominous. I somethings think about how Patsy Cline died, although that was a much earlier event. I don't call this heavy rock. I call it heavy pop, because it really is a very well constructed song. This is the only tune I know of Bloodrock from my youth, but I am tempted to check them out and see what else is in store, 49 to 50 years after it was released. I am going through a Terry Knight phase. He produced it. Plus was murdered by his daughter's boyfriend in 2004. Not the same set of events and, yet, very prophetic.
  • Chet Pomeroy from KeysWhen this came out I assumed it was a car crash and "hit something in the air" referred to the couple in the car being stoned. 50 years later I now read it was a plane crash. The car crash scenario hits home for more people and is therefore creepier. IMHO
  • Transplanted Hippy from VaI grew up understanding it was written in response to the Wichita State Univ. football team plane crash of October 1970.
  • Michael from LestatkattThe motivation for writing this song was explained in 2005 by guitarist Lee Pickens. “When I was 17, I wanted to be an airline pilot,” Pickens said. “I had just gotten out of this airplane with a friend of mine, at this little airport, and I watched him take off. He went about 200 feet in the air, rolled and crashed.” The band decided to write a song around the incident and include it on their second album.
  • Timothy from Lebanon TnD.O.A. Considered to be the most morbid song ever recorded. One would think due to the lyrics it was a plane crash. However they made a video in the mid eighties which reveiled a lightning bolt hitting the hood of the car. The Bouys Timothy was actually the name of the mule that was in the cave with them.
  • Dave from Marquette MiDropped acid to D.O.A. in 1971, songs been in my head since...
  • Rick from Belfast, Me2 of the morbid songs from the 1970's......this one(DOA) and Timothy by the Buoys....about cannabalism
  • Matt from San Francisco, CaI was 6 when this song came out, hardly able to grasp death but getting bombarded by its images via the nightly coverage of Vietnam. I was way too curious and stared far too long at the screen, or the harrowing images in Life magazine. This song added to the harrowing milieu of that time, and haunted me for years.
  • Mackail from Winnipeg, Mbthis song is tragic, gross and makes perfect scence.It is also one of the best songs i've ever heard
  • Rabitt from Sugar Land, TxOne of the greatest concerts I ever attended was Bloodrock opening for Grand Funk Railroad in Houston (probably early '70). I didn't know one thing about Bloodrock but was a huge Grand Funk fan, When Bloodrock took the opened and took the stage they set the tone and put on a great show at least as good as GFR. They were great showmen and great artist.
  • Beth from Charleston, WvThis was released shortly after the Marshall University's football team plane crash and I have always related it to that.
  • Chuck from Concord, NhIsn't it strange how we interpret things differently from each other? I have always believed this song to be about a car crash.."we were flying low, and hit something in the air.." but now I can easily see how it might be an aviation accident. Anyway, love the song even as morbid as it is!
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