Brooklyn (Go Hard)

Album: Notorious (2008)
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  • Brooklyn, we go hard, we go hard

    This is black hoodie rap
    There's no fear in my eyes where they lookin' at
    Better look on map, besides, me nah like to eye fight
    Me nah think such a ting is worth a man's life (Christ!)
    But if a man test my Stuy
    I promise he won't like my reply
    Boom bye bye, like Buju I'm crucial
    I'm a Brooklyn boy, I may take some gettin' use to
    Chain snatchin', ain't have it, gotta get it
    Same shitted, from Brownsville to Bainbrid-idge
    Fatherless child, Mama pulled double shifts
    So the number runners was the only one I hanged widith
    Before you know it I'm in the game, bang fidith
    Fear no orangutans, pe-deal cid-daps
    Like oranges-es, I'm dangerous
    Please tell me what the name of this shit

    Brooklyn we go hard, we go hard
    (B-R-O-O-K-L-Y-N, come again)

    I father, I Brooklyn Dodger them
    I jack, I rob, I sin
    Aww man, I'm Jackie Robinson
    'Cept when I run base, I dodge the pen
    Lucky me, luckily they didn't get me
    Now when I bring the Nets, I'm the black Branch Rickey
    From Brooklyn corners, burnin' branches of sticky
    Spread love, Biggie, Brooklyn, hippie
    I pity the fool with jewels like Mr. T
    With no history in my borough, they borrow
    With no intentions of returnin' tomorrow
    The sun don't come out for many, like Annie
    Half orphan, Mama never had an abortion
    Papa sort of did, still I managed to live
    I go hard, I owe it all to the crib
    Now please tell me, what the fuck's harder than this?

    Brooklyn we go hard, we go hard
    (B-R-O-O-K-L-Y-N, come again)

    While I'm doin' my time due to circumstance
    Cross that bridge, face the consequence
    Once bid 10, now I paid my dues
    Risk takers, we break the rules
    Get so dark but I see good
    Bed-Stuy stay high in my neck of the woods
    Now, let it ring out, it's a warnin'
    (Brooklyn) Let it be sworn in
    Gotta make it stick workin' like we blue collar
    Rip it to the core, underneath it all we harder
    Right into the clip, bring it to the floor
    One step, one step, give it up more
    The road is rough and the street's a mess
    Got big cash dreams and a sick death wish
    Robbin' out the commercial stash
    Kill the voice screamin' in my head

    Brooklyn we go hard, we go hard
    (B-R-O-O-K-L-Y-N, come again) Writer/s: JEFF BHASKER, JOHN HILL, KANYE WEST, NAEEM JUWAN HANKS, PATRICK REYNOLDS, SANTI WHITE, SHAWN 'JAY Z' CARTER
    Publisher: CONCORD MUSIC PUBLISHING LLC, Downtown Music Publishing, Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC, THIRD SIDE MUSIC INC, Universal Music Publishing Group, Warner Chappell Music, Inc.
    Lyrics licensed and provided by LyricFind

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