I Talk To The Wind

Album: In The Court Of The Crimson King (1969)
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  • Said the straight man to the late man
    Where have you been?
    I've been here and I've been there
    And I've been in between

    I talk to the wind
    My words are all carried away
    I talk to the wind
    The wind does not hear
    The wind cannot hear

    I'm on the outside looking inside
    What do I see?
    Much confusion, disillusion
    All around me

    I talk to the wind
    My words are all carried away
    I talk to the wind
    The wind does not hear
    The wind cannot hear

    You don't possess me
    Don't impress me
    Just upset my mind
    Can't instruct me or conduct me
    Just use up my time

    I talk to the wind
    My words are all carried away
    I talk to the wind
    The wind does not hear
    The wind cannot hear

    I talk to the wind
    My words are all carried away
    I talk to the wind
    The wind does not hear
    The wind cannot hear

    Said the straight man to the late man
    Where have you been?
    I've been here and I've been there and
    I've been in between Writer/s: Greg Lake, Ian Mcdonald, Michael Rex Giles, Peter John Sinfield, Robert Fripp
    Publisher: DistroKid, Universal Music Publishing Group
    Lyrics licensed and provided by LyricFind

Comments: 10

  • Beto from Salvador, Bahia, BrazilFor me the song is about a living man (straight, upright, alive) in contrast to the dead man (late, deceased), words go away in the wind, it’s too late, it’s no use talking to one you lost, he cannot hear anymore, the words are all carried away. That’s it. Peace!
  • I Love Tacos from Nowhere I interpret this song to be about a man losing his friend, and his friend moving on after life.
  • Billy from UsI think many are overcomplicating this song. I think the song is about someone who realizes that his good friend has nothing to offer, cannot help him grow, or learn or provide any value to him.
  • Jim from Brooklyn, NyIt's interesting that in the opening of the book of Job, God (perhaps the straight man?) asks Satan (possibly the late man?), "Where have you been?" Satan replies, "I've been roaming through the earth, here and there..." Could this possibly be the inspiration for the ensuing reflection?
  • Reg from Kemptville, On, -Unlike most folk, I'm not so much interested in the lyrics of a song as I am in the music itself. (For me the voice is another instrument.) With one exception the tracks on this L.P. are a dream to listen to.
  • Barry from Greenville, NcA beautiful, breezy song and some wonderful, imaginative drumming on this as well. Love the cymbals and it seems like the drummer is playing the "spaces" in the song as much as he is the beat!
  • Mike from Altamonte Springs, FlI guess you could consider playing a flute or sax "talking to the wind." Could be kind of auto-biographical.
  • Kim from Detroit, MnThe protagonist of the song is a counterculture person,a hippy or freak in the parlance of the day. Note the first line:

    Said the straight (conventional/conservative) man to the late (as in laid back, hippy) man, Where have you been?

    The "late" man replies with a laid back, obtuse response: "I've been here and I've been there and I've been in between."

    The title line: "I talk to the wind," is a typically surreal, psychedelic lyric of the time, although it is of a bit higher quality than most as are the melody and harmony.
  • Kent Lyle from Cincinnati, OhOne of two King Crimson songs not co-written by Robert Fripp.
  • Steveb from Spokane, WaI interpret it as a man isolated from the world, filled with knowledge that nobody cares for or understands, and so he sits alone with his mind, his enlightened words floating away into the wind...

    Greg Lake was a very deep man who wrote beautifully.
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