Vegetable Man

Album: The Early Years 1965-1972 (1967)
Play Video
  • In yellow shoes I get the blues
    Though I walk the streets with my plastic feet
    With my blue velvet trousers, make me feel pink
    There's a kind of stink about blue velvet trousers
    In my paisley shirt I look a jerk
    And my turquoise waistcoat is quite out of sight
    But oh oh my haircut looks so bad
    Vegetable man how are you?

    So I've changed my dear, and I find my knees,
    And I covered them up with the latest cut,
    And my pants and socks all point in a box,
    They don't make long of my nylon socks,
    The watch, black watch
    My watch with a black face
    And a big pin, a little hole,
    And all the lot is what I got,
    It's what I wear, it's what you see,
    It must be me, it's what I am,
    Vegetable man

    I've been looking all over the place for a place for me,
    But it ain't anywhere, it just ain't anywhere
    Vegetable man, vegetable man,
    He's the kind of person, you just gonna see him if you can,
    Vegetable man Writer/s: SYD BARRETT
    Publisher: T.R.O. INC.
    Lyrics licensed and provided by LyricFind

Comments

Be the first to comment...

Editor's Picks

Al Kooper

Al KooperSongwriter Interviews

Kooper produced Lynyrd Skynyrd, played with Dylan and the Stones, and formed BS&T.

Metallica

MetallicaFact or Fiction

Beef with Bon Jovi? An unfortunate Spandex period? See if you can spot the true stories in this Metallica version of Fact or Fiction.

Part of Their World: The Stories and Songs of 13 Disney Princesses

Part of Their World: The Stories and Songs of 13 Disney PrincessesSong Writing

From "Some Day My Prince Will Come" to "Let It Go" - how Disney princess songs (and the women who sing them) have evolved.

Superman in Song

Superman in SongSong Writing

Not everyone can be a superhero, but that hasn't stopped generations of musicians from trying to be Superman.

Stand By Me: The Perfect Song-Movie Combination

Stand By Me: The Perfect Song-Movie CombinationSong Writing

In 1986, a Stephen King novella was made into a movie, with a classic song serving as title, soundtrack and tone.

Donald Fagen

Donald FagenSongwriter Interviews

Fagen talks about how the Steely Dan songwriting strategy has changed over the years, and explains why you don't hear many covers of their songs.