Never Let Her Slip Away

Album: All This and Heaven Too (1978)
Charted: 5 67

Songfacts®:

  • In this song, Gold finds himself madly in love with a girl he's only known for a week. He's hoping - very optimistically - that he never lets her slip away.

    In the liner notes of his greatest hits album, Gold wrote, "I was very much in love with someone at the time (I'm still quite fond of her)." He revealed that this person was his girlfriend at the time, Laraine Newman, known for he work on Saturday Night Live.
  • J.D. Souther sang backup on this track, and according to Gold, Timothy B. Schmit was also at the session and joined in. You can hear them on the line, "On a Sunday afternoon." Souther is credited for his contribution, but Schmit is not, which is understandable since he had recently joined the Eagles.

    Souther later co-wrote a song for the Eagles, "Heartache Tonight," which Gold said had a "suspicious similar beginning."
  • Gold and his co-producer Brock Walsh created the rhythm track by banging on the walls and clapping, using overdubs to make a loop. Gold played the synthesizer on the track, and Ernie Watts played the saxophone.

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