Chances

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  • Co-written by Ryan Tedder and Shawn Mendes, along with the Canadian pop star's frequent collaborators Scott Harris and Geoff Warburton, "Chances" was released as the follow-up to Backstreet Boys comeback hit single "Don't Go Breaking My Heart."
  • The Backstreet Boys AJ McLean told Billboard that he has known Ryan Tedder ever since he began work in 2008 on his debut solo album. The OneRepublic frontman contributed production to that record and though none of his efforts made the final tracklisting, McLean has since been pushing him to send more material.
  • Asked why this was chosen as the follow up to "Don't Go Breaking My Heart," McLean explained it was close sonically, but lyrically "it's not your typical Backstreet Boys love song," which was something the guys liked. He added that it's "more of that realistic love story about chance, to find that person in the most precarious of scenarios. It's a really beautiful love song."
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