Friends and Enemies

Album: Ellipsis (2016)
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Songfacts®:

  • Frontman Simon Neil explained the song's meaning to The Sun: "Sometimes people that you think are really good friends slowly pick away at you," he said. "It takes you a while to really realize and think, 'Wait a minute we are meant to be supporting each other and actually every time we hang out I feel a lot worse about myself. Sometimes you have people in life who are trying to tear into you each time."
  • The song starts with heavy tribal drums before developing an unusual swagger. Simon Neil told NME: "We've taken it into this weird, funky Bill Withers territory, but with Black Sabbath heaviness. It's a wonky pop song that should probably be a single, a bit of a glam-rock stomp."
  • This is bassist James Johnston's favorite track from Ellipsis. He explained to Artist Direct: "This song took quite a lot of work to get right in the studio and there's something really satisfying when you get that moment when you feel like it just clicks and everything falls in to place."

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