• Black Country Communion frontman Glenn Hughes was the lead vocalist for Black Sabbath during the mid 1980s, as well as playing bass and performing vocals for some of the later Deep Purple lineups. During this period, Hughes found himself battling drugs and alcohol addiction and this song harks back to this period in his life when he had no spiritual faith. He told Musicradar.com: "This is one of the songs that came down to my wife – I played it for her to get a reaction; it was one of the first songs I wrote for this album. I just started singing about a guy who had run dry, who had no faith in life. As it so happens, I'm full of faith – now. But there was a time when the opposite was true, and I was faithless, hence the lyrics on this and a lot of the other songs. This period I'm talking about was during the '80s, when I went completely off the rails. I was drowning, man. I'm singing about s--t that happened to me years ago, but I can remember it so clearly, and it was very therapeutic for me to go back to that place. The band allowed me to do so. A lot of bands and producers would've tried to muzzle me: 'It's too heavy, it's too real!' But (producer) Kevin Shirley and the band wanted desperation. They wanted cold hard truths. That's what I'm exploring here."

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