Bridget McGuire

Album: The Unpublished Cole Porter (1910)
  • songfacts ®
  • According to Stephen Citron in Noel And Cole: The Sophisticates, "Bridget McGuire" was Porter's first commercially published song, seeing the light of day in June 1910.

    In The Complete Lyrics Of Cole Porter, edited by Robert Kimball, a bit more detail is given. Porter began songwriting in earnest between 1905 and 1909, while studying at Worcester Academy. Many of the songs he wrote at this time have been lost. In 1909-10, Porter entered Yale, living at Garland's Lodging House, 242 York Street, New Haven. "Bridget McGuire" was written here, and published as "Bridget".
  • In Cole: A Biographical Essay, Brendan Gill says this song and "When The Summer Moon Comes Along" are "the oldest surviving songs for which Cole wrote both music and lyrics." The original manuscripts were found after his death.

    In The Unpublished Cole Porter, Kimball says the two were found by accident after Porter's death in a large scrapbook that his mother had kept of her son's college experiences. >>
    Suggestion credit:
    Alexander Baron - London, England
Please sign in or register to post comments.

Comments

Be the first to comment...

Second Wind SongsSong Writing

Some songs get a second life when they find a new audience through a movie, commercial, TV show, or even the Internet.

Top American Idol Moments: Songs And ScandalsSong Writing

Surprise exits, a catfight and some very memorable performances make our list of the most memorable Idol moments.

Bob DaisleySongwriter Interviews

Bob was the bass player and lyricist for the first two Ozzy Osbourne albums. Here's how he wrote songs like "Crazy Train" and "Mr. Crowley" with Ozzy and Randy Rhoads.

Leslie West of MountainSongwriter Interviews

From the cowbell on "Mississippi Queen" to recording with The Who when they got the wrong Felix, stories from one of rock's master craftsmen.

Jon Anderson of YesSongwriter Interviews

From the lake in "Roundabout" to Sister Bluebird in "Starship Trooper," Jon Anderson talks about how nature and spirituality play into his lyrics for Yes.

Jonathan Edwards - "Sunshine"They're Playing My Song

"How much does it cost? I'll buy it?" Another songwriter told Jonathan to change these lyrics. Good thing he ignored this advice.