(800) HUMAN

Album: Songs For Imaginative People (2013)
  • Darwin Deez leader Darwin Smith described this rage-filled song to NME as an "anthem for existentialists." He explained: "'Human' is kind of a big 'what if' - what if before we got here we were all just bored disembodied spirit - angels - wasting away, watching the heavenly equivalent of lame infomercials, one of which was for the corporeal experience of humanity, and so we took the bait, and then once we got to earth we forgot how we got here (an inevitable part of the 'fine print' of birth), why we came here, and couldn't remember anything but the melody used on that commercial? That's the song. Sometimes life depresses you and makes you want to waste away and watch TV. Even for angels. But the song is a prayer for deliverance from the existential inauthenticity of that kind of laziness and submission."
  • Smith told NME that "the ooh-melody at the end of the song is depicted on the cover. And it is the same basic melody of the chorus. So if the chorus is the jingle to the infomercial for humanity, then the ooh-melody is 'how the jingle goes.'"
  • The song samples "800" by the English electronic music duo Autechre.
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