Birds Flew Backwards

Album: Kingdom of Rust (2009)

Songfacts®:

  • The Doves explained to the NME April 11, 2009: "There's a lot of intensity on this album so we wanted this to be a breather. It's just a snapshot of walking through a forest."
  • For this song, the band bought in Baluji Shrivastav to play the delruba. This is an Indian string instrument that is a cross between a sitar and a cello. Frontman Jimi Goodwin explained to The Line Of Best Fit: "I wanted an esraj which proved quite hard to sort out but the delruba is a close relative. Andy (Williams, drums) heard the demo of the song which was quite crude, quite simple and it reminded him of 'Nobody's Fault But My Own' by Beck which is off the album Mutations, which we both love. That's got that that swirling Indian string feel to it. And that got us thinking." Andy Williams added: "It seemed appropriate y'know. For a start it's got an Eastern melody and with the background vocals and that it seemed to lend itself to that instrument."

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