Never Said I Love You

Album: Envy Of None (2022)
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Songfacts®:

  • In this song, Envy Of None lead singer Maiah Wynne does a post-mortem on a relationship that didn't work out, telling her ex, "I never said I love you." That might be true, but we get the sense from her yearning vocal that she had strong feelings for this person.

    The song started with a chorus written by the group's bass player, Andy Curran. When he sent it to Wynne, she filled in the lyrics for the rest of the song.

    "I tried to relate it to a relationship, but maybe a modern-day relationship with casual dating and hook-ups where you don't realize you have intense feelings for somebody until it's too late, and you've lost them and you never told them that you really love them, and now they're gone," she said in a Songfacts track by track.
  • Envy Of None's guitarist is Alex Lifeson of Rush. He made no effort replicate the Rush sound on this or any other track from their self-titled debut album. "Never Said I Love You" is loaded with electronics and contemporary pop elements, and is the first track on the set. Lifeson told Songfacts how it came together: "This was an early song that Alf [the band's producer/multi-instrumentalist Alfio Annibalini] and Andy started working on. By the time it came to me, everything had been done, and I didn't really see a place for me to play on it. Alf's guitar parts were great. Everything about it sounded very complete. The only one area that I thought was weak at that time when I first received it was in the chorus. It seemed to me that this was such a catchy chorus with such a great vocal line and lyric, that it really needed to lift at that point. And it's quite a traditional chordal pattern.

    So, my initial response was to put big acoustics on it. The electrics were already there – they were playing a part that was very 'strummy.' So, with the acoustics playing in eights and sixteenths, it was creating a little more of this rhythmic pulse – that I thought was very effective for that song or that piece of music.

    Other than the middle eight were I play a finger-picking guitar part and answer, that's really all I thought it needed from the guitar department."
  • When penning the chorus, Andy Curran channeled '80s UK band bands like The Cure, Depeche Mode, The Smiths and Ultravox that wrote about broken hearts on the dance floors. "I thought it was time to reintroduce that theme but with something that was more upbeat," he said.
  • Blacktide Phonic/Visual Production filmed the music video. "It's very cinematic and I love all the moody cityscapes," said Curran. "The main character is very free spirited, and the video loosely follows the narrative in a subtle way. I love the picking of the flower petals: 'He loves me, he loves me not? Isn't that what life's all about... wanting to be loved or accepted?"

Comments: 1

  • Dave Hall from North Rhine-westphalia, GermanyWOW! what an amazing song and superb production / arrangement...like the Eighties classic vibe..brought up to date!
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