Zero Pharoah

Album: Get To Heaven (2015)
  • songfacts ®
  • This song finds vocalist Jonathan Higgs trying on absolute power and admitting that he too would fail to resist its corrupting influence. He told NME: "There is that line 'Why won't you ever say no' and not be corrupted, and then at the end, I say, 'I'm going to be it - I'm going to be the dick now."
  • The song is about rulers who once they start being treated like gods, wield far too much power and become corrupted. Higgs explained to The Line Of Best Fit: "Pharaohs are really the ultimate example of that - they somehow managed to get thousands of people to spend hundreds of years (or however long) to literally kill themselves dragging stones meant for a huge tomb, and they had slaves buried alive with them too so that they would have slaves in the afterlife... just the most insane s--t, really. They were revered as gods."

    "I was very interested in North Korea a while ago, and what's happening there in the way they deify their leader, and what that means and what it would feel like, and how f---ed up it is," he continued. "The central question being asked in the song is would you say no if you were offered that power? I'm also asking why - why you wouldn't say no, why won't you just turn it down?"

    "At the very end of the song I say 'I'll smash up your Pharaoh and I'll take it myself; I'll be corrupt... I'm no better'. It's the expression of absolute power corrupts absolutely, and then me being sucked into that corrupted wormhole," Higgs added. "Despite it being kinda laid-back sounding, I'm being pretty snarky about it all, like when I sing: 'They tell me he's a household name/only no one has a house anymore...' or the general feeling of 'oh well, everything's f--ked up, but at least we have the Pharaoh!'"
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