Cosmic Slop

Album: Cosmic Slop (1973)
Charted: 102
  • songfacts ®
  • Lyrics
  • One of the most potent grooves in the P-Funk canon, "Cosmic Slop" is also one of their most lyrically incisive tracks, telling the story of a woman with five children who works as a prostitute to feed her family. A God-fearing woman, she prays to the Lord, justifying her sins by pleading that she's doing it for her kids. The Devil hears her call, and answers:

    Would you like to dance with me?
    We're doing the cosmic slop


    In a Songfacts interview with bandleader George Clinton, he said it was inspired by "women that have to prostitute themselves to take care of their kids, and feel ashamed of themselves, or feel like they're not doing God's work by having to do that."

    He continued: "The instinct of having to take care of your kids is a strong instinct, so that's what that whole mental thing is. You think you're dancing with the Devil, and you have to do something like that to support your family. That's what that 'Cosmic Slop' is."
  • George Clinton wrote this song with Bernie Worrell, the Funkadelic keyboard player who was a huge part of their success. Clinton's bandleader Garry Shider, who wore a diaper on stage, handled the vocals. Shider and Ron Bykowski played guitar on the track.
  • The Funkadelic crew also recorded as Parliament, in part to avoid contractual entanglements. The more accessible songs generally went to Parliament, but Funkadelic did try for some hits. "Cosmic Slop," running 5:17 on the album, was cut down to 3:20 and released as a single, the only one from the album. It stalled at #102, but the song proved a live favorite and one of the most enduring P-Funk tracks.
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