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  • Lyrics
  • This song tells the story of a guy who gets really into a girl one summer while he's working at the snack bar. The become more than just friends, and then one night they get drunk and have a booty call. It gets even better from there: they end up moving in together and keeping their love life alive.

    In a Songfacts interview with G. Love, he explained: "I was rebounding from Aiden, my oldest son's mom, leaving. So I was pretty messed up. There are parts of the song, 'from friends to best friends to part-time lovers, now you're moving in the first date of September,' that are actually about her and her now-husband, who was our best friend at the time. There are ways of inserting parts of my life and other people's lives in the same song."
  • The phrase "booty call" started popping up in the late '90s and was popularized by a 1997 movie with that title starring Jamie Foxx and Vivica A. Fox. The film offers a helpful definition of the term:

    1) A late-night amorous encounter
    2) A chance to knock the boots

    By the time G. Love released this song, most people were familiar with the term.
  • The video stars Efren Ramirez, who played Pedro in the 2004 movie Napoleon Dynamite. Ramirez plays the "Booty Caller" in the clip, and gets some dialogue.
  • G. Love developed a live version with dirty lyrics where he describes the booty call in graphic detail.
  • The Hustle was the first G. Love album released on Jack Johnson's Brushfire Records label; Johnson appears on the album, but not on this track. In 1999, before Johnson had a record deal, he sang with G. Love on a song he wrote called "Rodeo Clowns," which was included on G. Love's 1999 album Philadelphonic. When G. Love lost his record deal with Epic, Johnson was happy to take him on board.
  • This was used in the 2011 movie Friends with Benefits, starring Justin Timberlake and Mila Kunis.
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