Courting The Squall

Album: Courting the Squall (2015)

Songfacts®:

  • This is the title song of Guy Garvey's debut solo album. Garvey explained the track's meaning to The Guardian: "The song is about somebody who regularly flirts with danger,"" he said. "I wanted it to be a gentle way of talking about a wreckhead, someone whose recreational pursuits are going to harm them."

    "It's amazing how quickly that accelerates," Garvey continued. "I've seen it dozens of times – somebody likes a drink and stays out drinking, and then they might have the odd line of charlie, and before you know it they're in pieces, or accidentally pregnant and they don't know who the father is, or running the car into a tree and splitting up with their girlfriend, and six months later realising what they've done. So Courting The Squall is in that sense of, 'I'm just a little bit worried about your habits'."

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