Continental Farewell

Album: Father Time (2008)

Songfacts®:

  • Hal Ketchum identifies this as "the sickest song he's ever written." In our Songfacts interview, Ketchum reveals the inspiration behind this song: "'Continental Farewell' comes from a character on Saturday Night Live, called 'The Continental.' It's Christopher Walken in a hotel room, in a smoking jacket, with a Hungarian accent trying to lure this woman to the room. And it's a handheld camera. So you never see the woman, it's from her perspective. All the tricks he's trying to play to keep her in the room. 'Champagne?' it's a fantastic piece. So that sort of inspired it. And I wrote it with Jim Riley, who's just a sick funny individual. We'd been trying to write love songs, and we'd written a couple, pretty skanky love songs, they weren't really going anywhere. And then that idea just kind of presented itself. So we went with it."
    Ketchum goes on to say that "Continental Farewell" is a special song that he only plays at a certain point in concerts where it would be absolutely appropriate. (Check out the full Hal Ketchum interview)
  • Father Time, the album this song is from, is a follow-up to Ketchum's 2007 album One More Midnight, which was only released in the UK.

Comments

Be the first to comment...

Editor's Picks

Greg Lake of Emerson, Lake & PalmerSongwriter Interviews

Greg talks about writing songs of "universal truth" for King Crimson and ELP, and tells us about his most memorable stage moment (it involves fireworks).

Edwin McCainSongwriter Interviews

"I'll Be" was what Edwin called his "Hail Mary" song. He says it proves "intention of the songwriter is 180 degrees from potential interpretation by an audience."

Adam Schlesinger of Fountains of WayneSongwriter Interviews

The guy who brought us "Stacy's Mom" also wrote the Jane Lynch Emmy song and Stephen Colbert's Christmas songs.

Harold Brown of WarSongwriter Interviews

A founding member of the band War, Harold gives a first-person account of one of the most important periods in music history.

Angelo Moore of FishboneSongwriter Interviews

Fishbone has always enjoyed much more acclaim than popularity - Angelo might know why.

The End Of The Rock EraSong Writing

There are no more rock stars - the last one died in 1994.