Hurricane

  • New Jersey-reared Ashley Frangipane's performing name is Halsey, which is both an anagram of her first name and the name of a street in Brooklyn. This track, about being your own person, was inspired by the singer's friend Zach. She explained to Complex: "He was an older guy I was seeing. He lived in Brooklyn on Halsey Street."
  • Speaking about the song on a Spotify track-by-track commentary, Halsey explained its meaning: "It's about a girl that kinda like falls for this guy who is gonna make things hard on her and is gonna take advantage of her, but she kinda ends up turning it around in the end and she says: 'I'm a wanderess. I'm a one night stand. Don't belong to no city. Don't belong to no man.' So it's kinda like her response to him, saying like you know, you can think you got me all you want, but I don't belong to anyone but me."

    "And umm you know I talk about Brooklyn, Brooklyn's my place. That's where Halsey comes from, Hurricane is a very special song to me and I love it."

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