Songfacts®:

  • According to the sheet music, this song has Words by Jos. Geo. Gilbert; Music by Horatio Nicholls, and was "Specially Composed for the Home-coming of the Heroine of the England-Australia Flight 1930, Miss AMY JOHNSON." It was arranged for "banjulele" Banjo and Ukulele by ALVIN D. KEECH, but a full recording was made by Jack Hylton and his Orchestra with vocalist Pat O'Malley. This 78 record was produced at the Small Queens Hall, London on June 2, 1930.
  • The song begins: "There's a little lady who has captured every heart," which is true enough, but it remains to be seen if everyone in town was singing this song, as the lyrics also proclaim. According to the Melbourne correspondent of the London Times, the song that was being sung on her arrival in Australia was "Johnnie's In Town."
  • The Hylton/O'Malley recording of "Amy" includes some silly sound effects, apparently of a plane flying, and of a radio commentator. Having said that, this dance number isn't so bad, certainly in comparison with some of the dubious compositions that tripped off the pen of Horatio Nicholls; lyricist Gilbert was one of his regular collaborators. Various other recordings were made of "Amy" including by Chris Hall and Pat O'Dell.
  • Amy Johnson's pioneering flight began at Croydon on May 5 and ended at Darwin, Australia, on May 24. She died in January 1941 after bailing out over the Thames Estuary, but had she lived long enough it is safe to say she would have preferred Al Stewart's later tribute "Flying Sorcery." >>
    Suggestion credit:
    Alexander Baron - London, England, for all above

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