Good Thing's Gone Bad

Album: Shake What God Gave Ya (2010)
Play Video

Songfacts®:

  • This is the closing track of American Country artist James Otto's third studio album, Shake What God Gave Ya. The song is a collaboration with Country legend Ronnie Milsap. Otto told The Boot: "That was one of my favorite parts of making this record - being able to collaborate with one of my favorite artists of all time, a guy I consider the godfather of Country Soul. He's the guy I point to most often when I bring up my style of music, because he is the guy who bridged the gap between those types of music."
  • When Otto performs this song at his live shows, he serves it in a mash-up with Milsap's Pop-Country hit, "Stranger in My House," which he told The Boot was the genesis for this duet.

Comments

Be the first to comment...

Editor's Picks

Dean Friedman - "Ariel"

Dean Friedman - "Ariel"They're Playing My Song

Dean's saga began with "Ariel," a song about falling in love with a Jewish girl from New Jersey.

Famous Singers' First Films

Famous Singers' First FilmsSong Writing

A look at the good (Diana Ross, Eminem), the bad (Madonna, Bob Dylan) and the peculiar (David Bowie, Michael Jackson) film debuts of superstar singers.

Todd Rundgren

Todd RundgrenSongwriter Interviews

Todd Rundgren explains why he avoids "Hello It's Me," and what it was like producing Meat Loaf's Bat Out of Hell album.

Marc Campbell - "88 Lines About 44 Women"

Marc Campbell - "88 Lines About 44 Women"They're Playing My Song

The Nails lead singer Marc Campbell talks about those 44 women he sings about over a stock Casio keyboard track. He's married to one of them now - you might be surprised which.

Marvin Gaye

Marvin GayeFact or Fiction

Did Marvin try out with the Detroit Lions? Did he fake crazy to get out of military service? And what about the cross-dressing?

Rush: Album by Album - A Conversation With Martin Popoff

Rush: Album by Album - A Conversation With Martin PopoffSong Writing

A talk with Martin Popoff about his latest book on Rush and how he assessed the thousands of albums he reviewed.