Blue Kiss

Album: Jane Wiedlin (1985)
Charted: 77

Songfacts®:

  • This was the first single Wiedlin released as a solo artist. She was a member of The Go-Go's, and rejoined the group when they got back together in the early '90s. Looking back in 2007, Wiedlin told us: "When I first became solo I had just that second quit The Go-Go's, and I was just really trying too hard to prove to myself that I'm much different than The Go-Go's, and I tried too hard to do something that was really, really different. And then I listen back on that record and I wish I had taken a year or two to really think about it before I just dumped this record out. Because I think it's very flawed. And then to me, as the years went on, and as I've gotten older, and I've gotten to care less and less about external things, like record companies and people and the public, I just write for myself, and if I really love a song, and if I get enough of those songs, I'll make a record, and I don't really have expectations about it anymore. And when you get to that point in life, to me, it actually becomes a truer representation of the writer."
  • Wiedlin: "That song, I had a friend, Randell Kirsch, he's like one of my brother's college roommates. He was a great songwriter, and he sent me this tape with like 1,000 songs on it. I mean, the guy was so prolific. And I just loved that song 'Blue Kiss.' So I asked him if I could do it. I ended up adding some parts to it, and some lyrics. It was really basically his song, though. But I was really attracted to the melody of that song, and also he had these stacked harmonies I thought were really beautiful, and that's why I wanted to do that song."

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